Treated Shoulder Conditions

Dr. James Ferries, Dr. Anthony Quinn, Dr. Brent Milner, Dr. Brian Laman and Dr. Jeremy Zebroski comprise the Shoulder Team at Sheridan Orthopedic Associates. This team is one of the most respected in all of Wyoming and combines decades of experience in both non-surgical and surgical treatments for conditions of the shoulder. The Shoulder Team at Sheridan Orthopedic Associates collaborates on each patient’s diagnosis to establish the most effective treatment plan.

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Labral Tear

The labrum is a type of cartilage found in the ball and socket joint of the shoulder where it meets the arm bone (humerus). This forms a ball at the shoulder where it meets the socket of the shoulder blade. These two bones are connected by strong ligaments which hold the bones in place. This is similar to the ball and socket joint of the hip. However, the shoulder joint is not as deep as the hip joint and is predisposed to being unstable.

Over time, this cartilage can become damaged due to small micro tears or trauma. The weakening and degeneration of this cartilage can lead to pain and instability of the shoulder. In more severe cases, the cartilage may tear completely causing the bones of the shoulder to rub together.

 

Athletes whose positions require repetitive throwing motions are susceptible to this injury as well as those whose jobs require repetitive motion of the shoulder.

Depending upon the severity and type of injury, the labrum may be partially or completely torn. If you suspect a labral tear, it is important to seek medical attention as this condition may worsen if left untreated.

Signs and symptoms of a Labral Tear may include:

  • Pain when raising the arms
  • Pain in the shoulder
  • “Catching” or “popping” of the shoulder joint
  • Feeling of the joint “locking”
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Weakness in the affected arm
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Adhesive Capsulitis

Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder, more commonly referred to as Frozen Shoulder, is a condition that is defined by pain and stiffness of the shoulder joint. This stiffness may be intermittent at first but will worsen over time. Frozen Shoulder occurs when the capsules that surround the shoulder joints begin to thicken around the joint causing pain and limited motion of the shoulder.

This condition is often seen in those who have had extensive periods of immobility of the arm and shoulder, such as those in a cast or sling. For others, this condition is brought on by chronic overuse of the shoulder joint. This condition is also more common in those with arthritic condition as arthritis may cause inflammation to the area.

Signs and symptoms:

  • Pain in shoulder
  • Limited range of motion of the shoulder
  • Inability to extend or lift shoulder
  • Pain when extending or lifting shoulder
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Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is the socket in which the two bones of the shoulder sit and where the four muscles that come together to form the shoulder tendon to cover the head of the arm bone (humerus). A fluid filled sac, called the bursa, lies between the socket and the bone and helps provide lubrication needed to extend and rotate the shoulder.

Over time, the cartilage of the rotator cuff can become damaged due to small micro tears or trauma. The weakening and degeneration of this cartilage can lead to pain and instability of the shoulder. In more severe cases, the cartilage may tear completely causing the bones of the shoulder to rub together. Some Rotator Cuff Tears are brought on by the formation of bone spurs that rub against the joint and irritate the cartilage.

Athletes whose positions require repetitive throwing motions are susceptible to this injury as well as those whose jobs require repetitive motion of the shoulder.

Depending upon the severity and type of injury, the labrum may be partially or completely torn. If you suspect a labral tear, it is important to seek medical attention as this condition may worsen if left untreated.

Signs and symptoms of a Rotator Cuff Tear may include:

  • Pain when raising the arms
  • Pain in the shoulder
  • “Catching” or “popping” of the shoulder joint
  • Feeling of the joint “locking”
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Weakness in the affected arm
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Shoulder Bursitis

Between the bones and joints of the shoulder lies a fluid filled sac, known as the bursa. The bursa provides lubrication so that the bones and joints of the shoulder can glide smoothly and maintain normal range of motion. When the bursa becomes irritated it can become inflamed and swollen causing pain in the shoulder. Eventually, the space may become too narrow for the tendons and the bursa causing an impingement when they are used.

The bursa may become inflamed as a result of injury or repetitive strain. Underlying conditions such as gout or infection may also lead to Shoulder Bursitis.

Signs and symptoms of Shoulder Bursitis may include:

  • Pain in the shoulder
  • Stiffness of the shoulder
  • Swelling of the shoulder
  • Sensitivity to touch