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Total Knee Replacement

Total Knee Replacement is an effective arthroscopic surgical treatment for those experiencing chronic knee pain as a result of arthritic conditions, ligament damage and tissue damage. Total Knee Replacement is offered when damage to the knee has affected more than one compartment of the knee. If the damage is contained to only one compartment of the knee, your surgeon may recommend a Partial Knee Replacement. This procedure uses one or more small incisions and small endoscopic cameras to allow surgeons to view damage to the area around the knee in high definition.

To begin this procedure, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the kneecap area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the knee in greater detail. Next, the damaged portions of cartilage between the femur and tibia are completely removed as well as a small piece of bone. The space created by the removal of cartilage and bone is then replaced by a custom metal implant that is designed the keep the knee mobile and flexible.

Next, a small plastic button is placed at between the femur and tibia as well as a small metal implant. These components create a smooth surface for the knee joints to glide on and resemble the natural anatomical elements of the knee. The incision is then closed with small sutures.

Partial Knee Replacement

Partial Knee Replacement is an effective arthroscopic surgical treatment for those experiencing chronic knee pain as a result of arthritic conditions, ligament damage and tissue damage. Partial Knee Replacement is offered when damage to the knee is contained to a single compartment of the knee. If the damage is affecting more than one compartment of the knee, your surgeon may recommend a Total Knee Replacement.

To begin Partial Knee Replacement, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the knee area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the area in greater detail.

Once the damaged areas have been verified your surgeon will use small shavers to remove the cartilage from the damaged compartment of the knee while the healthy cartilage is left intact. The ends of the femur and tibia (the bones that make up the knee) are then capped with a metal covering. A spacer is placed the caps to allow for a smooth and natural range of motion.

ACL Reconstruction

ACL Reconstruction is an effective arthroscopic surgical treatment for those experiencing chronic knee pain and weakness as a result of a torn ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). The ACL is not able to be sewn back together by itself so a tissue graft will be used. Your surgeon will discuss with you the best area on the body for donor tissue.

To begin ACL Reconstruction, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the knee area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the area in greater detail.

Once the torn ACL been verified, your surgeon will use small surgical instruments to trim the torn portion of the ACL. Next, small tunnels are made in the surrounding bone so that the new ligament can be threaded through these tunnels. This threading process allows for stability and strength of the newly reconstructed ACL.

Now that the portions of the ACL have been properly threaded, specialized surgical sutures are used to reconstruct the ACL using the tissue graft. These sutures are strong and flexible and allow for the ACL to remain as one complete ligament.

Arthroscopic Meniscectomy

An Arthroscopic Meniscectomy is an effective arthroscopic surgical treatment for those experiencing chronic knee pain as a result of a partial or complete tear of the meniscus. This procedure uses one or more small incisions and small endoscopic cameras to allow surgeons to view damage to the area around the meniscus in high definition. Once the camera has been inserted, the surgeon uses microsurgical tools to remove damaged tissue or debris that is causing knee pain.

Depending on the severity of the injury your surgeon may recommend either a partial or complete Meniscectomy.

To begin this procedure, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the meniscus area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the area in greater detail.

Once the surgeon has visualized and evaluated the meniscus, the surgeon may remove or trim the damaged area of the meniscus using a small surgical shaver or small surgical scissors that are inserted through one of the pre made incisions. Once the damaged portions have been removed the incisions are closed with small stitch or sterile strips.

Knee Injection Of Hyaluronic Acid

Most of the fluid in that is held in a healthy knee is what is known as hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid is the fluid that allows the knee bones and joints to glide smoothly and maintain range of motion in the knee. Studies have shown that those with arthritic conditions have a decreased level of hyaluronic acid causing the bones and joints to grind against one another.

The goal of Hyaluronic Acid Injections is to increase the amount of this substance in the knee which allows the joints to remain lubricated and mobile.

Hyaluronic Acid Injections are often an effective alternative for those looking to delay or temporarily avoid surgery. This procedure is performed under fluoroscopic and X-ray guidance to ensure accuracy and efficacy.

Arthroscopic Lateral Release

Arthroscopic Lateral Release of the Knee is an effective arthroscopic surgical treatment for those experiencing chronic knee pain as a result of an abnormal shifting of the kneecap (patella). This procedure uses one or more small incisions and small endoscopic cameras to allow surgeons to view damage to the area around the kneecap in high definition. Once the camera has been inserted, the surgeon uses microsurgical tools to trim or completely remove the lateral band of the knee (reticulum).

To begin this procedure, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the kneecap area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the area in greater detail.

Once the surgeon has visualized and evaluated the kneecap, the surgeon may remove or trim the lateral band. This results in a reduction of the lateral pull on the kneecap, which is the source of pain and weakness. Once the band is trimmed or removed the kneecap can then slide back into its natural position along the femur.

Tibial Tubercle Transfer

Tibial Tubercle Transfer is a procedure used to treat patellar instability, patellofemoral pain or osteoarthritis of the knee. The goal of this procedure is to stabilize the patella (kneecap) by realigning it with the femoral groove so that the patella sits in an normal anatomical position.

Knee MicroFracture

Knee Microfracture is an effective arthroscopic surgical treatment for those experiencing chronic knee pain as result of damaged knee ligaments.   To begin Knee Microfracture, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the knee area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the area in greater detail.

Next, a small surgical tool, known as an awl, is inserted into the premade incision.   Using the awl, the surgeon creates several small holes, known as microfractures, into the patella. These microfractures trigger the release of repairing cells as well as increase blood flow to the damaged ligaments. This increase of blood and repairing cells allows the ligaments to heal more naturally without having to be directly operated on. The incision is then closed with either a stitch or sterile adhesive strips.

OATS Procedure

The goal of the OATS procedure (Osteochondral Autograft Transfer System) is to transfer healthy knee cartilage into damaged areas of the knee. The intention is to use this healthy sample of cartilage to promote the growth of new cartilage in the damaged area of the knee.

To begin this procedure, the surgeon will make one or more small incisions around the kneecap area where the pencil sized cameras and surgical instruments will be inserted. Next, a clear sterile fluid is injected that allows the surgeon to visualize the area in greater detail.

Once healthy cartilage is identified, a second incision may be made over the knee. Using a specialized tool, a small section of damaged cartilage is removed from the knee and replaced with a small amount of healthy knee cartilage.

Once the implanted cartilage is secure, the incision is closed with small sutures of ster-strips.

MCL Reconstruction
MCL reconstruction surgery can be carried through a Minimally Invasive approach with the utilization of an arthroscope. An arthroscope is a surgical tool, a about the size of a pencil, with a camera that illuminates the structures inside the knee. The arthroscope is connected to a larger screen, allowing the surgeon to see the interior of the knee through this small incision, rather than a larger one. This method significantly decreases the risk of complication and will lead to an expedited recovery. In the first step of this procedure, the surgeon will make two small incisions in the skin and in one of them, inserts the arthroscope. The ruptured ligament is removed and that area is cleaned of any debris. The graft, generally taken from the Achilles’ Tendon, is inserted and will serve as the new MCL. The surgeon will utilize screws to fix the graft to the bone and hold it into place while the ligament heals. If any other areas of the knee are damaged due to a prior injury, the remainder of the knee is easily accessible and any other injury can be dealt with during the same procedure.
PRP Injection

PRP Injections (Platelet Rich Plasma) the patients own restorative cells to aid in the repair of damaged cartilage and reduce pain. PRP Injections can also be an effective alternative to surgical procedures and provide several weeks or months of pain relief.

In this non-surgical procedure a small sample of the patients own blood is taken and then placed into a centrifuge. The centrifuge is used to separate the blood plasma from other components. The PRP is then concentrated and injected around the damaged area of the knee. This injection of plasma triggers the bodies healing response and helps jumpstart the healing process.

Also, because only the patients own blood is used, the risk of infection or transmittable illness is eliminated.

PCL Reconstruction

PCL reconstruction surgery can be carried through a minimally invasive approach with the utilization of an arthroscope. An arthroscope is a surgical tool, a about the size of a pencil, with a camera that illuminates the structures inside the knee. The arthroscope is connected to a larger screen, allowing the surgeon to see the interior of the knee through this small incision, rather than a larger one. This method significantly decreases the risk of complication and will lead to an expedited recovery.

The surgeon will make two small incisions in the skin and in one of them, insert the arthroscope.  The ruptured ligament is removed and that area is cleaned of any debris. A tunnel is created to accept the new graft, which will serve as the new PCL. The graft is usually taken from the patella tendon but can be drawn from the hamstring as well.

The surgeon will utilize screws to fix the graft to the bone to hold it into place while the ligament heals. If any other areas of the knee are damaged due to a prior injury, the remainder of the knee is easily accessible and any other injury can be dealt with during the same procedure.